logo  

Go to Home Page MyDentSpace Community Submit a Press Release or Blog (For Members) Contact Us

Home arrow News Feeds
  feedback sitemap
Saturday, 01 November 2014  

Visitors: 17394387
Health DirectoryHEALTH DIRECTORY
Ads Menu
Post your Ads
SPONSORS

 
2 out of 3 Employers Find Qualified Candidates wit
Jobs in Canada

 

Thank you for your support.

Enter Amount:


SECTIONS

 

 email us  Email Us
 FAQs FAQs
 Info More Info
 Dental Health News Health News
 Dentist Community News Dentist News

 

News Feeds
Predicting aggressiveness of oral cancer PDF Print E-mail
Studying mouth cancer in mice, researchers have found a way to predict the aggressiveness of similar tumors in people, an early step toward a diagnostic test that could guide treatment, according to...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278898.php

 
Dr. Jeffrey May joins the Tarpon Springs Dental practice of Dr. Xhoana Gjelaj PDF Print E-mail
Dr. Xhoana Gjelaj (pronounced Joanna July) welcomes Dr. Jeffrey May to her Tarpon Springs Dental practice on South Pinellas Avenue.
 
Impact of sugar on tooth decay remains a major health concern, says FGDP(UK) PDF Print E-mail
It is important that the effect of sugar intake on tooth decay is considered alongside obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease as a major public health challenge, according to the Faculty of...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278910.php

 
Vascular health in indigenous Australians improved by treating gum disease PDF Print E-mail
A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278867.php

 
Covington Who's Who Selects Dr. Renata B. Adames as an Honored Member of the Executive and... PDF Print E-mail
Dr. Renata B. Adames, Dentist and Owner of Newport Smiles Dental Spa, has been selected as an Honored Member of the Covington Who's Who Executive and Professional Registry. The selection recognizes Dr, Renata B. Adames's commitment to excellence in Healthcare and Dentistry.
 
Treating gum disease improves vascular health in Indigenous Australians: Study PDF Print E-mail

A simple non-surgical gum disease treatment markedly reduces the thickness of the wall of the arteries, a risk factor for heart disease, according to a first of its kind study among Aboriginal Australians.

The study findings may be of particular importance to Aboriginal Australians, who in general have poorer oral health and higher rates of cardiovascular disease.

Published in the latest issue of Hypertension, the study reports a significant decline in thickening of the wall of the carotid artery a year after a single session of gum treatment.

"The study shows that non-surgical periodontal therapy significantly reduced the progression of thickening of the carotid artery over a one-year period," says study co-author, University of Sydney vascular disease expert Dr Michael Skilton.

"The magnitude of the reduction in thickening of the carotid artery in the treatment group, relative to the control group, is similar to what has been observed in other clinical trials in high risk populations.

"The effect is comparable to a 30 per cent fall in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol -- commonly referred to as 'bad' cholesterol -- which is associated with a decreased risk of heart disease.

"It's also equivalent to the effects of reversing four years of aging, 8 kg/m2 lower body mass index, or 25 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure."

The study was prompted by conjecture about the causative relationship between periodontal (gum) disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease and is among the first using a randomised trial to investigate a periodontal intervention on atherosclerotic disease.

Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting the soft and hard structures that support the teeth. In its early stage, the gums become swollen and red due to inflammation, which is the body's natural response to the presence of harmful bacteria.

In the more serious form of periodontal disease (periodontitis), the gums pull away from the tooth and supporting gum tissues are destroyed. Bone can be lost, and the teeth may loosen or eventually fall out.

Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease -- collectively known as 'cardiovascular disease'. It usually causes no symptoms until middle or older age but as narrowing and hardening of the arteries accelerates, they choke blood flow, causing pain and other serious cardiovascular complications.

Despite reducing thickening of the carotid artery, the study found no effect of periodontal therapy on arterial stiffness -- another pre-clinical marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease and risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

"Future studies may tell us whether a more intensive approach to periodontal therapy, including regular periodontal maintenance schedules, can produce more marked improvements in vascular structure," Dr Skilton says.

"The findings indicate that periodontal therapy has a systemic impact beyond treating gum disease.

"If further studies can confirm our report the treatment of periodontal disease may become reducing means by which to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially in high risk populations such as Indigenous Australians."

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sydney. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

http://feeds.sciencedaily.com/~r/sciencedaily/health_medicine/dentistry/~3/BXYK9qvNwBI/140626101710.htm

 
PACUCOA Activity: Presentation of Survey Forms PDF Print E-mail
UP College of Dentistry (http://updent.blogspot.com/2014/06/pacucoa-activity-presentation-of-survey.html)
 
New insight into oral microbiome offered by computational technique PDF Print E-mail
Scientists have applied a new technique to comprehensively analyze the human oral microbiome - providing greater knowledge of the diversity of the bacteria in the mouth.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278676.php

 
Dental hygiene profession sees 'moment of opportunity' to improve access to oral health care PDF Print E-mail
As dental hygienists prepare to take increased responsibilities, Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice provides critical updatesWith opportunities to take increased responsibility for...

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/278660.php

 
Previously 'hidden diversity' of mouth bacteria revealed in study PDF Print E-mail

A new computational method for analyzing bacterial communities has uncovered closely related, previously indistinguishable bacteria living in different parts of the human mouth. The technique, developed by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists, provides high taxonomic resolution of bacterial communities and has the capacity to improve the understanding of microbial communities in health and disease. The study will be published in PNAS Online Early Edition.

An important step in understanding the role of oral bacteria in health and disease is to discover how many different kinds live in the mouths of healthy people, and exactly where in the mouth they normally live.

Using a novel computational method called oligotyping, developed by MBL Assistant Research Scientist A. Murat Eren, scientists analyzed gene sequence data from nine sites in the oral cavity. The data was provided by The Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an effort of the National Institutes of Health that produced a census of bacterial populations from 18 body sites in more than 200 healthy individuals. DNA in these samples was sequenced from the gene in bacteria that encodes ribosomal RNA, called the 16S rRNA gene, or 16S.

To this point, an understanding of the biomedical significance of HMP data has been hindered by limited taxonomic resolution. "Different species of bacteria can have very similar 16S gene sequences, sometimes differing by only a single DNA base in the region that was sequenced, and errors in DNA sequencing can also create differences of one or a few DNA bases," says the study's co-author Jessica Mark Welch, an Assistant Research Scientist at the MBL.

While the HMP data set has been used to identify bacteria broadly, to genus-level groups, it has never been used to identify bacteria more precisely, to the species level. "This genus-level grouping meant that many bacteria with similar DNA, but very different roles in the human microbiome, were lumped together, limiting the usefulness of the data," says Mark Welch.

Using oligotyping, Eren, Mark Welch and their colleagues Gary Borisy of the Forsyth Institute and Susan Huse of Brown University re-analyzed the HMP 16S gene data from dental plaque, saliva, and the surfaces of the tongue, cheek, gums, hard palate, tonsils, and throat. They found closely related, but distinct, bacteria living on the tongue, on the gums, and in plaque. For example, bacteria in saliva and in hard palate, tonsils, and throat resembled the tongue bacteria, while bacteria on the cheek were similar to bacteria on the gums. Bacteria from plaque below the gum-line also were detected on the tonsils, suggesting that the tonsils provide an oxygen-free environment where these bacteria can grow and come into contact with the human immune system.

Oligotyping detected kinds of bacteria that differed by as little as a single DNA base in the sequence tag. These differences in the 16S gene did not change the properties of the bacteria, but acted as markers for larger changes elsewhere in the bacterial genome which, the researchers believe, lead to different bacterial properties that make the bacteria prefer one part of the mouth over another.

"These distinct bacteria were present in the data all along, but were indistinguishable because they were so similar to each other -- hidden in plain sight, and revealed by oligotyping," says Mark Welch. "This method offers a better understanding of the distribution of precisely defined taxa within the mouth, and demonstrates a level of ecological and functional biodiversity not previously recognized. The ability to extract maximum information from sequencing data opens up new possibilities for the analysis of the dynamics of the human oral microbiome."

Eren has applied the oligotyping method to improve taxonomic resolution in other bacterial communities, including those from wastewater, from marine sponges, and from ocean water. The researchers say the technique has the capacity to analyze entire microbiomes, discriminate between closely related but distinct taxa and, in combination with habitat analysis, provide deeper insights into the microbial communities in health and disease. "The diversity of naturally occurring bacteria continues to impress us, and our study demonstrates that a comprehensive understanding in microbial ecology through marker genes requires our attention to subtle nucleotide variations," says Eren. "I anticipate that the ecologically important information oligotyping helped us recover from the human oral microbiome will intrigue other investigators to take a second look from their microbiome data sets."

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Marine Biological Laboratory. The original article was written by Gina Hebert. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

http://feeds.sciencedaily.com/~r/sciencedaily/health_medicine/dentistry/~3/b9VmLDM63Is/140623154759.htm

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 49 - 64 of 3531

 
MyDentSpace Login
Visit the Philippines for your Dental Treatment Needs
ADVERTISE HERE!
Search MyDentSpace
MydentSpace Members

 PRESS RELEASES AND BLOGS

Press Releases & Blogs
NEWS SECTION Learn about the Stock Market Place your company logo here and advertise at pinoydental Pinoydental is on facebook! Become a Fan! Dental Tourism Resources Pinoydental on blogspot.com! Join the Scuba enthusiasts and reef conservation community Follow pinoydental.com on Twitter! Pinoydental at wordpress.com Dentpro Dental Services Providers: Tel: 986-4127 Place your company logo here and advertise at pinoydental EASYFOREX.COM : The Ultimate Trading Machine. Join Now Pinodent Dental Office Management Software pinoydental at Friendster Start your Website business here Dentist and Student Resources
 
Copyright © 2007 pinoydental.com All Rights, Reserved. !